November Fishing Report

Now that Thanksgiving has come and gone and my heart and belly are full of the good stuff its time to focus once again on the waters surrounding the Florida Keys.  As temperatures drop up north, the average temperature in Key Largo will be around 76 degrees during the day and around 65 degrees at night. The winter weather here is heavily influenced by major frontal systems, bringing both brisk winds and cooler air to the area. Backcountry guides will be keeping a close eye on the radar as these cold fronts move their way over the islands. Winds are a major concern as they can make or break your day. High west winds are the most challenging for backcountry guides, so they will pay close attention to these cold fronts and the direction of the wind. If the winds happen to be blowing in from the west skilled guides will hide behind many productive islands so their clients do not feel the choppy bay waters.
 
This past week the water temperature in the gulf was approximately 70 – 72 degrees. The clarity of the water was murky, the way most guides like it when targeting mackerel, cobia, jacks, bluefish, trout, mangrove snapper and many species of sharks. The action has been steady however, it will be better after this next cold front moves across the keys. The water temperature will drop allowing many of these species to move closer to the islands. I have been productive with the use of Berkley Power Pro fishing line with a Yellow Chartreuse Hank Brown Hook-up Jig and a box of chum. I drop my chum in the water and after approximately 15 minutes there will be a variety of species arriving for the feast. Strong currents means more fish. Presentation of your lure will not be a factor with these target fish. All you need is the right current and a good box of chum.
 
The month of December will bring plenty of target fish for your pleasure.  Redfish and sea trout will be the more prominent species biting during this month. A few lingering bonefish packs will hold out on the flats but as the water temperature drops so does your chances for success. If you still want to pursue the elusive bonefish I suggest waiting until after mid day when the waters are warmer. You will have your best shot during the outgoing tides. As the water sits up on the flats during high tide it has a chance to warm. The bonefish will be waiting on the edges of the flat for the tide to begin to reseed off the flats. When the tide begins to move you should begin to poll up onto the flats as the bonefish will begin to search for their favorite food; shrimp, quarter sized crabs, and other small crustaceans. Make sure to bring your patients and your Flying Fisherman polarized sunglasses.
 
Until next time ask yourself this one question;
 R-U Fishing Yet?
 
Captain Richard Burson

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